Meeting Programs

AAFG 2022-23 Meeting Programs

General Notes
Membership meetings are held the 2nd Monday, September – May, except December.
As we navigate a new normal, the Ann Arbor Fiberarts Guild will remain flexible and offer a combination of virtual and in-person meetings.

Meeting Formats
In-Person = In September, October, April and May, speakers will present in person at Zion Lutheran Church, and we will physically gather.
Zoom = November, January, February, and March presentations and participation will be exclusively on Zoom. (We will not meet in person.)

Monthly Schedule 

September 12, 2022 (In-Person Only)
“Millie Danielson Fashion Show”
Millie Danielson
“Out of Yourself, Create” – Andre Gide
“Looking back, this statement has always been a definition of my philosophy. Trained as an Arts and Crafts teacher, I pursued many forms of art expression – watercolors, sculpture, fashion, printing, metal and wood working. A course in Serape weaving at the University of Mexico incorporated many of these techniques – design, color, texture, purpose. When a loom was given to me, I felt obliged to honor the gift by learning all I could about weaving. And a career was born!!!

Such pursuits have resulted in a body of work which has included many tapestry commissions, fashion shows, entries into many fiber exhibitions, and exploration into repurposing materials foreign to the weaving/fiber tradition.” – Millie Danielson

Millie Danielson is an original in every sense of the word, from her approach to design in all aspects of fiber arts to the fashions she creates and wears. Actively engaged in the community at large and a long-time member of AAFG, we are delighted to honor Millie with a fashion show featuring the work she has designed and created over her career.
www.milliedanielson.com

October 10, 2022 (In-Person)
“Hope and Healing One Piece at a Time”
Mary Gilhuly
An artist and “peace/piece maker,” Mary Gilhuly will describe her unique journey of healing through mosaic art. She will share the stories behind creating one-of-a-kind works to honor the memories of those affected by the Newtown, CT/Sandy Hook school shooting, and the kidnapped Nigerian girls. Far from being morose, Mary’s story, and the creative process that brings them to life, is truly inspirational.
www.songandspirit.org

November 14, 2022 (Zoom)
“The Committee, Critic and Judge: How to Neutralize Their Influence and Learn to Love Your Work”
Jane Dunnewold
Critiquing artwork is an acquired skill. Useful advice is grounded in a working knowledge of design and color theory. The more you know about these areas the better your advice becomes. However, there are basic, quantifiable qualities of good work that can be learned quickly and applied immediately, and Jane will share how to identify these characteristics.

Jane Dunnewold teaches and lectures internationally, and has mounted numerous solo exhibitions, including Inspired by the Masters (National Quilt Museum (2020) & Texas Quilt Museum (2018). A second mixed media series featuring re-purposed quilt blocks and gold leaf was exhibited at the McNay Art Museum in San Antonio, Texas (2017) and more recently at the Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach, Fl. Dunnewold has authored numerous books, including the classic Complex Cloth (1996) and Art Cloth: A Guide to Surface Design on Fabric (2010.) She is a former President of the Surface Design Association and currently facilitates a ten-month Creative Strength Training community online. www.janedunnewold.com

January 9, 2023 (Zoom)
“Color
Laura Bryant

Creative Director and founder of Prism Yarns, Laura M. Bryant trained as a fine artist in color and textiles at the University of Michigan. She is a life-long knitter and has written six books including The Yarn Stash Workbook, The New Knitter’s Template (coauthored with Barry Klein), the recently produced DVD Knitter’s Guide to Color with Laura Bryant, and the video, Yarn to Fit with Barry Klein. Artful Color, Mindful Knits from XRX Books is her latest book. Laura is also a nationally recognized weaver, specializing in double weave. She has work in many major corporate collections and is a recipient of an NEA individual artist grant in support of her work.  www.prismyarn.com

February 13, 2023 (Zoom)
Ellen Willson Threads of Interest Series: Lecture #5
“Cultural Appropriation”
Dakota Mace
How can we work to stop accepting cultural appropriation and rather encourage cultural appreciation? What are ways in which artists and designers can learn with and through Indigenous objects, like those in the 13,000-object Helen Louise Allen Textile Collection, while honoring the peoples, histories, and knowledge systems that created those things and continue to give them meaning? To think through these questions, Dakota Mace will share her thoughts on cultural appropriation and help participants understand the stakes of cultural appropriation for Indigenous communities. Dakota will teach us how to develop a tool kit of questions and approaches you can use when engaging with a wide range of cultural objects in an ethical and respectful way. 

Dakota Mace (Diné) is an interdisciplinary artist whose work focuses on translating the language of Diné history and beliefs. Mace received her MA and MFA degrees in Photography and Textile Design at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her BFA in Photography from the Institute of American Indian Arts. As a Diné (Navajo) artist, her work draws from the history of her Diné heritage, exploring the themes of family lineage, community, and identity. In addition, her work pushes the viewer’s understanding of Diné culture through alternative photography techniques, weaving, beadwork, and papermaking. She has also worked with numerous institutions and programs to develop dialogue on the issues of cultural appropriation and the importance of Indigenous design work. She is currently a grad advisor in painting and drawing at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the photographer for the Helen Louise Allen Textile Center and the Center of Design and Material Culture. Her work as an artist and scholar has been exhibited nationally and internationally at various conferences, collectives, museums, and galleries, including Textile Society of America, Weave a Real Peace, Indigenous Photograph, 400 Year Project, Wright Art Museum, Contemporary Arts Center, Kemper Museum of Art, and the Wallach Art Gallery. She is represented by Bruce Silverstein Gallery in New York City.

March 13, 2023
TBA

April 2023
Village Theater Exhibit Jury
(Exact date TBA)

April 10, 2023 (In-Person)
“Photographing Fiber Art” 
Eric Law
Your art is only as good as your images, and you need great images if you expect to exhibit and sell your work. Eric will cover the five essentials for successfully photographing fiber art. Topics include the most important camera settings, lighting and shooting different types of fiber art, how to quickly edit the images, and the easiest way to format them for a website and show entries.

Eric Law is a professional photographer, consultant, and the founder of ShootMyArt™. He works exclusively with artists and galleries to present their artwork at its best. His clients include many well-known and emerging artists in the Detroit area and across Michigan, and his images of their artwork have appeared in books and national magazines. Eric is a frequent lecturer to artist groups and teaches photography workshops. He is a member of Professional Photographers of America and works from his studio in Hazel Park, Michigan.

Eric also exhibits his own fine art photography. www.ericlawphotography.com 

Artwork credit below: middle – Bonnie Kay; right – Anne Flora

May 8, 2023
TBA

 

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